Working the land

Forest & Backyard

Below you will find our best tips, advice and ideas to get the most out of your working life in the forest and in the backyard. We have also provided some useful guidance when you are buying or doing maintenance on a Jonsered product.

FR 2318

Buying guide: ride-on mower

Consider your needs first when you are buying a ride-on mower. Here is our 7-tip guide to get the right machine for your working life.

Choosing the right ride-on mower depends on how big your lawn is, how much work you want to do yourself, and how much you want to leave to the machine when it comes to driving, collecting cuttings, etc.

If you have a large lawn and opt for a ride-on mower that can carry accessories, you can save time and effort when clearing leaves, snow and the like. Your Jonsered dealer will be happy to give more advice on choosing the right mower for your needs.

7 tips before buying a ride-on mower

1. Don't buy a ride-on mower that is too small. A powerful machine will do a better job.

2. A good collector ride-on mower can also be used for collecting autumn leaves, or trimmings from hedges and shrubs, and much more.

3. Can your dealer service the mower? Do they have spare parts and accessories?

4. Is the mower easy to look after? Is there a good user manual?

5. Will the mower run on unleaded petrol?

6. Can your dealer demonstrate the mower? Can they give you useful working instructions?

7. Always ask to test-drive a ride-on mower before you make the decision.

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GT52F

Buying guide: garden tractors

Consider your needs first when you are buying a garden tractor. Here is our 7-tip guide to get the right machine for your working life.

Choosing the right garden tractor depends on how big your lawn is, how much work you want to do yourself, and how much you want to leave to the machine when it comes to driving, collecting cuttings, etc.

7 tips before buying a garden tractor

1. Don’t buy a tractor that is too small. A powerful machine will do a better job.

2. A good collector tractor can also be used for collecting autumn leaves or trimmings from hedges and shrubs, and much more.

3. Can your dealer service the tractor? Do they have spare parts and accessories?

4. Is the tractor easy to look after? Is there a good user manual?

5. Can the dealer demonstrate the tractor? Can they give you useful working instructions?

6. Always ask to test-drive a tractor before you make the decision.

7. Will the tractor run on unleaded petrol?

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Jonsered man in forest with clearing saw and car

Buying guide: clearing saws

Consider your needs first when you are buying a clearing saw. Here is our 7-tip guide to get the right machine for your working life.

The clearing saw is used to clear forests, bushes and undergrowth. A clearing saw has a shorter shaft for better maneuverability in dense stands. The acute angle of the bevel gear facilitates directional felling. A thumb-operated throttle also helps clearing work. Jonsered saws are available in several different designs, each optimized for professional forestry workers or other regular professional use.

7 tips before buying a clearing saw

1. Choose a machine with an effective anti-vibration system that allows you to work longer.

2. Choose a lightweight machine, especially if you work full time.

3. Your clearing saw should be high powered and have a high torque and rapid acceleration for maximum efficiency.

4. Your machine should have an ergonomic harness for the best relief, comfort and efficiency.

5. The handlebar should be angled relative to the shaft, to prevent an uneven load being placed on your back.

6. The handlebar can be angled and folded down, for easier transport and storage.

7. If you plan to work in cold climates, choose a clearing saw with heated handles.

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CS 2172 - CS 2166

Buying guide: chainsaws

Consider your needs first when you are buying a chainsaw. Here is our 10-tip guide to get the right saw for your working life.

When you decide to buy a chainsaw, you should naturally consider your own needs first. What do you want it for? How often will you use it? Do you work in the forest every day or do you just need it to cut firewood?

10 tips before buying a chainsaw

1. Safety is important. Make sure the saw has essential safety features such as kickback protection, chain brake, right hand guard and catcher stud.

2. Are both handles adequately protected from vibration? Vibration will quickly cause fatigue.

3. Choose a powerful enough saw right from the start. Many people buy an underpowered saw the first time.

4. Is the air filter system designed to avoid clogging with sawdust?

5. Is the saw easy to maintain? Is there a good user manual?

6. Will the saw run on unleaded petrol? Can you use vegetable-based chain oil?

7. Can the dealer service your saw? Do they have spare parts and accessories?

8. Can the dealer demonstrate the saw? Do they offer useful operating instructions on video and in brochures?

9. Can the dealer supply you with the necessary protective equipment?

10. Do you want to work indoors and outdoors? If so, buy a good electric saw that is built by professionals.

Jonsered has a chainsaw for every type of user, from big powerful saws for full-time professionals, to small easy-to-use casual saws. We will make sure you get exactly the saw you need. Your Jonsered dealer will be happy to give more advice on choosing the right chainsaw for your needs.

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Brushcutter action

Buying guide: brushcutters

Consider your needs first when you are buying a brushcutter. Here is our 7-tip guide to get the right machine for your working life.

You use a brushcutter for clearing grass, small bushes and undergrowth. The brushcutter is more robust and stronger than a grass trimmer, and comes in a number of engine sizes. The denser the vegetation you have to clear, the more powerful the machine you need.

With accessories, you can use the same machine for trimming grass, clearing undergrowth and shrubs as well as thinning out smaller trees. The brushcutter is fitted with a longer shaft to increase its working range.

7 tips before buying a brushcutter

1. Choose a machine that is powerful enough for the vegetation you plan to clear.

2. Equip your machine with an ergonomic harness for the best relief, comfort and efficiency.

3. The handlebar should be angled relative to the shaft, to prevent an uneven load being placed on your back.

4. The machine must have excellent vibration dampening to ensure you have the energy to work for a long time without getting tired.

5. The handlebar can be angled and folded down, for easier transport and storage.

6. The wider the range of accessories and cutting equipment, the greater the range of applications.

7. Buy your machine from a servicing dealer who can help you with accessories, service and spare parts.

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Limbing, US, 2min 43sec

How to limb with a chainsaw

Once the tree is on the ground you can start limbing. This can be a dangerous job if not done properly. Here is our expert step-by-step guide to doing this.

To avoid kickback, you should constantly watch the position of the bar tip to avoid contacting a hidden branch with the kickback sector of the tip.

As always you should keep a grip round the front handle with your left thumb and apply full throttle before you start cutting. Once again, plan your work and always try to think one step ahead.

1. Correct working height and working position

When you limb a tree you should stand on the left side of the trunk. The starting position is with your feet apart, back straight and the saw resting on the trunk. If the tree is resting on the stump and branches, or on a log or rock, it will be at a good working height so you can work safely and comfortably.

Work from the root end towards the tip. Always keep the trunk as a barrier between you and the saw as you work your way along the tree.

2. How to limb broad-leaf trees

A. Branches on the side of the trunk can be cut downwards with the chain pulling. Let the body of the saw rest against the trunk and rotate the bar in a lever motion towards the branch.

B. You can cut branches that stand up vertically from the top of the trunk with the saw lying on its side, either with the chain pulling or pushing. Use your thumb to control the throttle.

C. If thicker branches are pressing against the ground you may need to cut them from below with the chain pushing, to prevent the bar and chain from being pinched. First make a shallow cut in the top to prevent the branch from splitting. Watch out in case it springs up when you cut through.

D. With really thick or uneven branches it is easier to cut them bit-by-bit into manageable lengths. First make a cut in the underside before you cut off a length from above. There is a considerable risk of kickback during limbing.

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Maintenance, US, 2min 59sec

Learning to sharpen a chainsaw chain

The saw chain must be kept sharp in order to cut efficiently, safely and with accuracy. It is recommended that you learn how to sharpen the chain yourself. This is how it’s done.

Professional loggers sharpen their chains several times every working day, because they know that a sharp chain is just as important as a powerful engine.

How often should you sharpen the chain? This depends on how much you use the saw, but when the chain starts to seem blunt it is usually time to sharpen it. The appearance of the chips gives a good indication of the chain’s condition. A sharp chain produces fine, regular wood chips, while a blunt chain just produces sawdust.

Equipment

You will need a round file, a flat file, and a combination file gauge that fits your chain. Your Jonsered dealer has everything you need. A vice makes the task easier. Secure the bar so you have both hands free.

A little saw chain theory

Each link in the saw chain works rather like a miniature plane. The effectiveness of the chain is determined by the difference in height between the cutter (1) and the raker (2). This height difference controls how deep the cutter bites into the wood. The raker should be about 0.50.8 mm lower than the cutter.

Cutters

You sharpen the cutters first. Lay the file gauge on the chain. The arrows on the gauge should point in the chain’s direction of rotation. File the tooth using light, regular pushing strokes, at an angle of about 30 degrees to the bar.

File each tooth the same number of strokes. File every second tooth from the right, and those in between from the left. A tip: If you have secured the bar in a vice it is easier to file every second tooth from one side, then turn the saw around and file the rest from the other side.

Rakers

Lay the raker gauge on the chain and use the flat file to file each raker flush with the gauge. The gauge has two positions: H for hard species of wood or frozen timber, and S for soft species of wood.

Warning: If you file the rakers without a gauge you might file them down too far. This will result in the chain biting too deeply, which increases the risk of kickback, excessive vibration and poor accuracy.

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Traditional felling, US, 4min 52sec

Felling with a chainsaw step-by-step

Plan your tree felling carefully. Trees must be felled safely and in the direction you want them to fall. Here is our expert step-by-step guide to doing this.

1. Planning and preparations

Once you are familiar with your chainsaw it is time to fell your first tree. To make felling as safe and efficient as possible it is important to plan felling in advance and always think one step ahead. To start with, never work alone in the forest. Always make sure you have someone with you. A mobile phone is a good idea; as it lets you quickly call for help if you need it.

2. Choose the felling direction

Once you have chosen a tree to fell, you should decide what direction you want it to fall. You should consider the following: Is the tree leaning? Do the branches hang mostly in one direction? Which direction is the wind blowing?

The easiest choice is to fell the tree in the direction it would naturally fall due to slope, overhang and wind direction. Felling in another direction requires a special technique, more effort, and is sometimes just impossible.

It is an advantage if you can fell the tree across a log, rock or stump. This ensures a comfortable working height for limbing and cross-cutting. Note: If other people are in the vicinity, the safe distance for them is at least two tree lengths.

3. Limbing the lower trunk

First cut away any low branches that could get in the way. But remember never to cut above shoulder height. Do not stand directly behind the saw. Use the trunk as a barrier between yourself and the saw.

4. Clear your work area and path of retreat

Clear the ground around the tree and a few meters/yards behind it. You need to be able to take a few steps backwards if the root end should spring up.

5. Felling a tree in the right direction

To make a tree fall in the chosen direction, you should use a method that professional loggers call “directional felling.” This means that you cut a sort of hinge in the trunk, which steers the tree as it falls to the ground.

To create this hinge you first cut out a wedge-shaped piece, using a “directional cut,” on the same side you want the tree to fall. Next you make the “felling cut,” by cutting horizontally from the opposite side. However, you should not saw through the entire stem, but leave a hinge of about 3 cm. This hinge controls the felling direction.

6. Directional cut

A. Stand with your feet apart behind the tree and lean your left shoulder against the trunk to keep you steady. Aim along the top of the front handle in the felling direction. This gives you the right direction for the directional cut, since the handle on a Jonsered saw is at right angles to the bar.

B. First make the top directional cut. Keep a firm grip around the front handle with your left thumb, apply full throttle and bring the saw downwards at an angle of about 60 degrees. The depth of the directional cut should be about 1/4 to 1/5 of the trunk’s diameter. Start high enough up on the trunk so that you have space for the bottom directional cut.

C. Stay in the same position and make the bottom directional cut. Keep your left thumb around the front handle and use full throttle (control the throttle with your right thumb).

Bring the saw upwards at an angle of about 30 degrees and stop precisely when you reach the top cut, neither too far nor too short. It is very important that both cuts meet precisely so that the hinge steers the tree all the way to the ground.

While you are making the bottom cut you should look down the top cut to see when both cuts meet. If you have done it properly you should have a perfect directional cut with a 90 degree opening.

7. Felling cut

First a tip: Stop the engine and check the fuel level now. If the fuel runs out in the middle of a felling cut it could be dangerous.

A. The felling cut should be level with the tip of the directional cut, or slightly above it. Do not forget to leave a hinge with a uniform thickness of at least 3 cm, about 1 1/4 inch.

B. If the diameter of the trunk is less than the bar length, you simply make the felling cut directly from the back and in the felling direction.

C. If not, you should start by bringing the saw in from the side of the trunk and moving backwards around the tree as you cut.

D. Stand firmly with your feet apart, keep your left thumb around the handle, and apply full throttle before you start cutting.

E. When the felling cut is roughly halfway, stop the saw and insert a pry bar or drive a wedge into the cut. This prevents the tree from falling backwards and trapping the saw. A pry bar also makes it easier to fell the tree. Then complete the felling cut, but take care not to saw into the pry bar.

Note: If you are a beginner we recommend that you do not fell trees with a diameter larger than the length of the bar, because it is easier and safer to fell the tree with a single felling cut made from the back of the tree.

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Safety, US, 3min 19sec

Chainsaws and personal safety

Wearing the right clothes and safety equipment when working with a chainsaw is extremely important. Here is an easy-to-follow guide to prevent injury.

When operating a chainsaw, you should never work in jeans or everyday shoes, even if you just cutting a little wood outside the front door. Protective clothes and equipment must always be used.

6 tips to dress safely

1. Protective trousers are important. Jonsered’s logging pants have built-in saw protection, with long fibres designed to jam the chain in an instant if it penetrates the outer fabric.

2. An approved helmet with hearing protectors and visor is also very important. These protect your hearing, eyes, face and head.

3. Our protective boots have steel toecaps, saw protection over the instep and a rugged tread pattern. They protect your feet and give you a safe footing.

4. Work gloves protect your hands from small cuts and grazes. Especially important when you sharpen or replace the chain.

5. A first aid kit should always be kept handy. Keep it in your shirt pocket or logger’s belt if you have one.

6. A long sleeved shirt or jacket is essential to protect your arms from sharp branches and flying chips.

You will find everything you need to work safely, and in comfort, at your local Jonsered dealer and in the Jonsered catalogue.

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